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Owing to the scope and pace of change, society has become increasingly knowledge-based so that higher learning and research now act as essential components of cultural, socio-economic and environmentally sustainable development of individuals, communities and nations. In this environment, it is essential that higher learning and knowledge creation involve effective partnerships among academic and non-academic learning institutions and communities to create and apply learning and knowledge with stakeholders that are managing and creating sustainable development initiatives. Growing concern regarding the importance of the contribution that higher education institutions make to society has aroused increasing debate about their relevance and credibility amid escalating social problems. An underlying premise of community engagement is the understanding that not all knowledge and expertise resides in the academy, and that both expertise and great learning opportunities in teaching and scholarship also reside in non-academic settings.

This conference will explore how LIS educators and researchers can develop curricula, programs, and research activities that enable active partnerships with communities and civil society to manage and create change. How can LIS programs increase opportunities for experiential, service oriented, and community engaged student learning? How can we develop further collaboration between LIS programs and their larger communities (local, regional/ state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity?

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Monday, January 16
 

3:00pm

ALISE Board of Directors Meeting
Monday January 16, 2017 3:00pm - 7:00pm
Georgia 9
 
Tuesday, January 17
 

8:00am

Registration
Tuesday January 17, 2017 8:00am - 6:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

Placement Services

Resumes/CVs and job descriptions are available both online and in binders located at the Placement Services area located in Rooms 121, 123, 125, 127. A message board, and schedule of interview room assignments will also be available in the Placement Services area. Arrangements for interviews should be made directly between candidates and recruiters using the message board. Please check the board often.


Tuesday January 17, 2017 8:00am - 8:00pm
Rooms 121/123

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop: Pedagogical (Re)-vision: from Concept to Course

In January 2015, a diverse group of professionals, drawn from a broad spectrum of information sectors, came together at an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded National Planning Forum to set a framework for re-visioning LIS education. Within the context of “Envisioning Our Information Future and How to Educate for It”, participants proposed a number of proofs of concept which could be explored, field tested, and refined prior to being incorporated in a White Paper Report to IMLS and the information community. Informed by the discussion at the Planning Forum, the ALISE 2016 conference included a workshop introducing design thinking as a concept and process.

This ALISE 2017 interactive workshop will focus on one proof of concept involving innovative pedagogy. Following a recap of design thinking principles and applications presented at ALISE 2016, participants will be introduced to a case study exemplar of innovative pedagogy developed and delivered within a design framework. The interactive segment of the workshop will engage small groups in discussing and assessing a prototype syllabus with reference to design criteria of desirability, feasibility, and viability. The final plenary will offer an opportunity for groups to share their evaluations, and to summarize opportunities to innovate in the design of course content and pedagogy with the goal of enabling those interested to implement such a course.


Speakers
EA

Eileen Abels

Simmons College, School of Library and Information Science
avatar for Linda Smith

Linda Smith

Professor and Associate Dean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Linda C. Smith is professor and associate dean for academic programs in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She joined the faculty in 1977. She works with graduate students on-campus (MS, CAS, PhD) and, since 1997, online (MS, CAS). She teaches courses on Information Organization and Access, Reference and Information Services, and Information Sources & Services in the Sciences. She is a past... Read More →


Tuesday January 17, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Georgia 2/3

12:00pm

unCommons
ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

Tuesday January 17, 2017 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Georgia 7/8

1:00pm

ALISE Academy: The LIS Educator's Career Life Cycle of Social Responsibility: Issues and Solutions

The 2017 ALISE Academy focuses on the strategies that educators can develop as they engage with their community and in social responsibility. Three presenters, who are at different stages of their career lifecycle, share issues and solutions that emerge from their experience as they engage with their community and in social responsibility. They address questions that include: 1) How does one engage in social justice during a tenuous and early stage in her or his career? 2) What are the means to capitalizing one's work later in her or his career? And 3) How does one leave a legacy of community engagement and social responsibility? The Academy provides an opportunity for participants to contribute to developing strategies and solutions to challenges.

This session will be limited to 125 participants, first-come, first-served. Be sure to register for this complimentary session during conference registration.


Speakers
avatar for Bharat Mehra

Bharat Mehra

University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Dr. Mehra's research examines diversity and intercultural communication, social justice in library and information science (LIS), critical and cross-cultural studies, and community informatics or the use of information and communication technologies to empower minority and underserved populations. He has applied action research towards community building and community development activities while collaborating with racial/ethnic groups... Read More →


Tuesday January 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Georgia 2/3

1:00pm

ALISE Board of Directors Meeting
Tuesday January 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Georgia 9

4:00pm

4:30pm

ALISE Leadership Orientation
Tuesday January 17, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Georgia 2/3

5:30pm

Speed Meeting
Meet new friends and connect with old ones during this conference take on "speed dating."

Tuesday January 17, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Georgia 7/8

5:30pm

6:30pm

Opening Reception/Works in Progress Poster Session
Join us for hors d’oeurves and a cash barto celebrate the opening of the conferenceand to view Works in Progress posters. TheWorks in Progress Poster session — withposters from faculty, doctoral students, andlibrarians — presents research in its formativestages and provides an opportunity for presentersand conference attendees to exchange ideas in aninformal setting.

Tuesday January 17, 2017 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Capitol Ballroom
 
Wednesday, January 18
 

7:30am

7:30am

First Timers' Breakfast
Wednesday January 18, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Capitol Ballroom

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday January 18, 2017 7:30am - 6:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

Exhibits
Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

Placement Services

Resumes/CVs and job descriptions are available both online and in binders located at the Placement Services area located in the Rooms 121, 123, 125, 127. A message board, and schedule of interview room assignments will also be available in the Placement Services area. Arrangements for interviews should be made directly between candidates and recruiters using the message board. Please check the board often.


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:00am - 8:00pm
Rooms 121/123

8:00am

unCommons
ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:00am - 8:00pm
Georgia 7/8

8:30am

Session 1.3 Juried Panel: Tell Me! These Things I Need to Know about the Program Accreditation Review Process
Accreditation is a process of self-evaluation, which provides a unique opportunity for a school to assess the quality of its academic program and public accountability against ALA standards. It is a voluntary, collegial undertaking that involves peer- and community-assessment of the program and its outcomes. A school engages deeply with a range of communities (e.g., faculty, students, alumni, and employers) during the evaluation process to assess program outcomes. So, what does accreditation self-evaluation and assessment process entail? What are faculty roles and responsibilities during the accreditation review process? What strategies should a school use to prepare its program and communities/stakeholders for continued accreditation? What are the roles and responsibilities of school program administrators? How are you planning for the ALA accreditation review? What are the perspectives of ERP members? What’s the best that could happen and what to do next? What’s the worst that could happen and how to plan for the next step?

Speakers
avatar for Denice Adkins

Denice Adkins

Associate Professor, SISLT, University of Missouri
avatar for Kristin Eschenfelder

Kristin Eschenfelder

Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Kristin R. Eschenfelder (PhD, Syracuse 2000) is a Professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests focus on access and use regimes – or the complex, multi-level networks of laws, customs, technologies and expectations that shape what information we can access in our daily lives and how we can make of it.  Her recent work examines development of and changes to... Read More →
avatar for Heidi Julien

Heidi Julien

Chair and Professor, University at Buffalo
digital literacy, information behavior, higher education


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 5

8:30am

Session 1.4 Juried Panel: Communities in Crisis: What Everyday Acts of Terrorism Tell Us About Social Responsibility in LIS
Over the past several years, we have witnessed an unprecedented number of tragedies. From the Paris bombings to the Charleston church shooting and so many others, terrorism has become a part of our everyday life. Consequently, these acts of terror have had a far-reaching impact on our global and local communities. Here in the United States, police shootings and public protests in cities such as Ferguson and Baltimore have also resulted in crises that have been particularly hard-felt, but more significantly, they live vividly in our memories. The fact is, we are not only learning about these events from mainstream news sources, but we are also seeing these events unfold in real time – and seeing footage of the actual events replayed in perpetuity. In other words, because of social media and mobile technology, news today can be reported directly from the source as it is happening. The attacks on the Orlando Pulse Nightclub and the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, serve as good examples of this expedient nature of information.

This panel will discuss what every day acts of terrorism tell us about community engagement and social responsibility in LIS. Panelists will present a DIY idea/activity/plan that will advance our understanding of this issue across the curriculum, research, and composition of faculty and/or students in LIS education. Often faculty may not feel they have the background or expertise to address these pertinent, yet controversial issues individually or at their home institution. This session will address this gap by having each presenter that is straightforward and implementable.

Speakers
RC

Renate Chancellor

Catholic University of America
avatar for Nicole Cooke

Nicole Cooke

Assistant Professor, The School Information Sciences, University of Illinois
SP

Sarah Park Dahlen

St. Catherine University
AG

Amelia Gibson

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
BJ

Beth Joy Hereford

University of Washington - Information School
SL

Shari Lee

St. John's University
TS

Tonia Sutherland

University of Alabama, United States of America


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 3

8:30am

Session 1.1 A Juried Paper: Colleagues and Communities: Engaging Labor Across Intra-Institutional Digital Divides
The study and practice of digital preservation is evolving, and as such professionals in this area of LIS are constantly educating people about their work. This occurs in LIS educational programs, but also professionally within the institutions where they work and for the public as people become desirous of preserving their digital lives: a large part of their daily work is educating people about what they do and why others should be doing it too. My work examines the implementation of digital preservation workflows in Europe and the US and investigates how digital preservation initiatives serve as sites of tension for multiple audiences in ways that impact work and engagement in memory institutions. Implicit in this are many communities who are affected by the privileged status afforded to digital work at institutions that have historically been repositories for analog materials.

Speakers
RS

Rhiannon Stephanie Bettivia

University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, United States of America


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 1.1 B Juried Paper: Engaging the Public through Digital Publishing
Our presentation addresses the logistical challenges of teaching a complex digital publishing tool in a distance course and encourages instructors to think about selecting the right tools to make their course projects accessible to the public. Furthermore, the project’s focus on “diverse history” encourages students to see themselves and their community members as active agents who decide what stories we include and exclude in our histories.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Tracy

Daniel Tracy

LIS and Research Services Librarian, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 1.2 SIG: In the interim: Strategies for successful interim administrative appointments
Many academic programs, including those in library and information science are facing a shortage of people willing to move into administrative roles. Increasingly departments and schools are appointing interim administrators while searches are conducted or while failed searches are repeated. Interim appointments may also occur in cases of prolonged illness or in periods of wider administrative reorganization within a university.

This presentation will be of interest to any faculty member who is seeking an administrative role, who is being asked to undertake or is currently serving in an interim administrative appointment, or for administrators who seek to understand how best to deploy faculty members in administrative roles, especially on a limited-term appointment.

Speakers
avatar for Mirah Dow

Mirah Dow

Professor and Interim Dean, Emporia State University
AJ

Andrew J. M. Smith

Emporia State University, United States of America


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 2

8:30am

Session 1.5 SIG: Promoting Community Engagement and Social Responsibility through Innovative Teaching
The Innovative Pedagogies SIG will offer a program focused on “Promoting Community Engagement and Social Responsibility through Innovative Teaching.” Each presentation will last approximately 10 minutes, with a discussion period following all of the presentations. Topics include examining culture, bias, and equity in computer programming; using elements of hip-hop as a pedagogical tool to encourage social responsibility; providing reference services to incarcerated people through a reference course; integrating partnership-based assignments into every course; teaching the community-led approach to outreach; and using criticality, a blend of critical thinking, critical pedagogy, and social ethics, in service- and project-based assignments.

Moderators
avatar for Don Latham

Don Latham

Professor, Florida State University
Information literacy, digital literacies, youth services, young adult literature

Speakers
avatar for Emily Drabinski

Emily Drabinski

Coordinator of Library Instruction, Long Island University Brooklyn
avatar for Martin Wolske

Martin Wolske

Senior Research Scientist & Adjunct Faculty, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Martin came to the Graduate School of Library and Information Science in 1995 to serve as the first full-time systems administrator for Prairienet Community Network, where we looked at ways to bring this relatively new thing called the Internet to the community to foster stronger community and democracy. He currently is a senior research scientist with the Center for Digital Inclusion. Martin has served a range of boundary spanning roles... Read More →


Wednesday January 18, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 4

10:00am

Morning Break
Wednesday January 18, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

10:30am

Keynote Presentation: Community Engagement through the Right of Access to Information: Assuring Inclusion of Marginalized Populations
Access to information is a fundamental right enshrined in the universal declaration of human rights. Information is the cornerstone of good governance, efficient and equitable public administration, and the exercise of rights. Importantly, access to information helps to ensure that citizens have a more meaningful voice for community engagement and decision-making. However, often in our societies it is the most vulnerable and marginalized populations who suffer the greatest due to limited access to information. Even in countries with statutory rights to information, it appears that regardless of socio-economic levels, women and marginalized populations are less likely to receive and access information. As various tools are applied to address the web of adversities facing marginalized persons and women - poverty, illiteracy, violence and inadequate opportunities for quality participation - insufficient focus has been paid to the power that information can play in confronting these myriad challenges.

Access the keynote webpage.

Speakers
LN

Laura Neuman

Director, Global Access to Information Program


Wednesday January 18, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia

12:15pm

Council of Deans, Directors, and Program Chairs Meeting
All program deans, directors, and chairs are invited to attend.

Wednesday January 18, 2017 12:15pm - 2:30pm
Capitol Ballroom

12:30pm

Birds of a Feather
Meet fellow conferees who share your teaching subject interests for informal, roundtable discussions about course content, teaching techniques, learning activities, and best practices. Attend looking for advice or offering knowledge and experience. Discover contacts for the rest of the conference and beyond.  

Wednesday January 18, 2017 12:30pm - 1:45pm
Georgia

1:00pm

JELIS Editorial Board Meeting
Wednesday January 18, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Georgia 9

2:00pm

ALISE Awards & Papers
ALISE/ProQuest Methodology Paper Competition 

ALISE/Bohdan S. Wynar Research Paper Competition 

ALISE Research Award, 2016 Update 

Moderators
avatar for Xiaofeng Li

Xiaofeng Li

PhD Candidate, Rutgers University
I am a PhD candidate at Rutgers University in the area of Library and Information Science with ABD status. My dissertation examines young people’s information practices and collaboration in informal learning environments, especially an after-school technology club in a school library makerspace and a public library makerspace.

Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 1

2:00pm

Session 2.4 Juried Panel:Bringing critical librarianship to your classroom: Practical approaches to tough concepts
For graduates of MLIS programs to be socially responsible and engaged in their communities, their education must adequately prepare them for that work. Typically LIS programs have addressed social responsibility and engagement through exposing students to the traditional values and ethics of the field–values that on the surface speak to openness, equality, free expression, and full access to information. But as critical theory has argued for a century or more, the practices of information creation, collection, categorization, instruction and use as enacted in libraries, archives, and museums are not as socially progressive as the values statements imply. Embedded in such practices is the idea of “neutrality”–that librarians and libraries should be objective and impartial as a means to provide equality and access for everyone. However, neutrality is never neutral, and in staking a claim to neutrality in information practice, librarians often unintentionally perpetuate systems of exclusion or oppression (Jensen, 2004). Promoting neutrality in effect promotes indifference, which in turn maintains the dominant power structures in society that are systemically unequal. Thus, there is a potential gap between the values and practices LIS programs teach and the expectation of producing graduates who are socially responsible and fully engaged with their communities.

Speakers
DA

Denise Agosto

Drexel University
avatar for Nicole Cooke

Nicole Cooke

Assistant Professor, The School Information Sciences, University of Illinois
avatar for Miriam Matteson

Miriam Matteson

Kent State University, United States of America


Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 5

2:00pm

Session 2.1 A Juried Paper: Community informatics in an aging society: Studying public libraries and senior centers to understand the digital literacy of older adults
The information society is also an aging society. This means that as information technology becomes woven into the fabric of daily life, the median age of humanity continues to rise. The participation of this growing population of older adults in the information society is often seen in the popular press and even in scholarship as dependent on their ability to cope with their supposedly declining minds and declining bodies. This paper reframes this phenomenon by studying older adults in the communities where they live.

Speakers
avatar for Noah Lenstra

Noah Lenstra

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Georgia 2/3

2:00pm

Session 2.1 B Juried Paper: The Serbian connection: Diversity education through university and community partnerships in Serbia
This presentation will discuss the development of the partnerships in Serbia, the structure of the academic courses that revolve around the study trips, and the development of the students in the areas of cultural understanding and diversity. It will identify the various levels of support within the university to make this partnership a reality, and the long-term commitments that must be made before embarking on a similar project. It will also discuss in detail the development of the curriculum materials and the changes that have proved necessary to provide the students with a solid foundation for their learning. Student’s own comments on their learning and discovery will also be presented to highlight the impact of this type of learning experience on the students.

Speakers
AJ

Andrew J. M. Smith

Emporia State University, United States of America


Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Georgia 2/3

2:00pm

Session 2.2 SIG: Women’s Engagement with Technology: Personal and Work Places

How are women engaged in technology in their daily personal lives and in the workplace? What efforts by education effective recruit women into information technology? Get the inside stories – and recommendations -- in this two-presentation session.

1) “Technology Tamers: The influence of women in ICT adoption, use and enjoyment”

This presentation will focus on the results of a qualitative study in India and Australia that explores ways in which middle-class, well-educated females use ICT for everyday use and the influences they have on extending that adoption, use and enjoyment of technology into their family units. The focus will include discussion of how libraries can best meet the needs of such users to forge digital inclusion ICT pathways.

2) “STEMing information studies: Exploring educational opportunities to enhance gender equity”

This presentation reports the results of a discourse and content analysis of STEM gender equity websites and IS publications that identify opportunities for IS programs and research activities to more proactively reduce gender inequities in the field.


Moderators
Speakers
LF

Lesley Farmer

Professor and Program Coordinator, CSU
I coordinate the librarianship program at CSULB, and manage the CSU ICT Literacy project. My research interests are digital citizenship, literacies, assessment, and collaboration. See my website http://k12digitalcitizenship.wikispaces.com and http://cyberfamilies.blogspot.com


Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 2

2:00pm

Session 2.3 SIG: Community Engagement & Social Responsibilities: Frameworks for Pedagogy and Praxis

We talk and teach a lot about collaboration and outreach, assuming that everyone has a shared definition of these terms and a shared vision of how they look in praxis. Rather than focus on providing best practices for teaching community engagement and/or social responsibility, or more examples of empowering youth as change agents, this session is designed to provide LIS educators with alternative ways of conceptualizing these terms. By thinking about frameworks rather than instances or examples, we invite LIS educators to re-think how they model and teach these concepts to the next generation of practitioners.

We propose a panel of four invited guest speakers, from within and outside of our field, who have their own interpretations of engagement, collaboration, and outreach. They will each present a 10-minute overview of their framework and then the attendees will participate in a brainstorming session to discuss how one or more of these frameworks can best serve them in their pedagogy.


Speakers
avatar for Cindy L Welch

Cindy L Welch

University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Graduate Education


Wednesday January 18, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 4

3:30pm

Afternoon Break
Wednesday January 18, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

4:00pm

Session 3.5 Juried Panel: Essential Partners in Community Engagement and Social Responsibility: Causal Relationships between Librarians’ Best Practices, Student Learning, and Improvement Science

Panel Proposal 

Congruence with Conference Theme

School librarians are learning community partners with significant social responsibility to improve students’ future preparedness—and to provide evidence of that impact. In support of the ALISE conference theme’s contention that “…higher learning and research now act as essential components of cultural, socio-economic and environmentally sustainable development of individuals, communities and nations,” the proposed panel will explore documenting the nature and extent of school librarians’ contributions to student outcomes. Panel content will be relevant to many information professionals’ preparation and practice. 

Relevance to Current and Emerging Issues in LIS Education

Recently ACRL published a report of academic librarians’ efforts to build evidence for positive connections between library services and student success[1]. Researchers found that student outcomes improved with library instructional services, library research consultation, library instruction, and library space use.

ACRL’s focus on assessing student engagement suggests that LIS concerned with providing evidence that professionally prepared librarians have a causal impact on student success and that there is ample opportunity to examine similar phenomena in other library contexts.

School library researchers have already been working in this space. In 2014, IMLS supported a convening of 50 school library and related researchers for Causality: School Libraries and Student Success (CLASS), a national forum on causal research in school libraries. A panel of reputed researchers, anchored by Thomas Cook, an eminent scholar in causal research design, led the forum. Forum discussions culminated in a white paper[2] that outlines an ambitious ten-year agenda to move from exploratory to causal research that reflects the National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Education’s Common Guidelines (2013).[3] The agenda’s ultimate goal is to determine causal relationships between effective school librarians’ work and student learning.

The CLASS project led to CLASS II, a current IMLS research project in which teams of researchers from FSU, ODU, and the UNT are executing the white paper. In Phase One’s first stage, the research teams are conducting a mixed research synthesis (MRS)[4] of research on causal relationships between student learning and learning activities that occur within and beyond school. The research outcomes will influence LIS curriculum content and contribute to the knowledge base relating to librarian effectiveness.


Speakers
LC

Lenese Colson

Florida State University, United States of America
SK

Sue Kimmel

Associate Professor, Old Dominion University
Ask me about earning a PhD in curriculum and instruction.
avatar for Barbara Schultz-Jones

Barbara Schultz-Jones

Associate Professor, University of North Texas Information Sciences Department
I'm interested in school libraries worldwide. My research and interest in learning environments led me to membership in the International Association of School Librarianship (IASL) and past-Chair of the School Library Section of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA). I've led study abroad projects to Thailand, Albania, Peru, Ukraine, Russia, Germany, and Czech Republic.
avatar for Lois Wine

Lois Wine

Doctoral Student, Old Dominion University, United States of America
I am pursuing a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction with a School Library cognate. My research interests are collaboration and information literacy.


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Atlanta 4

4:00pm

Session 3.1 A Juried Paper: Connecting Libraries and Learning with Community Organizational Needs
For 7 years the University Libraries and the Department of Library and Information Studies, at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, have collaborated on a learning partnership called Real Learning Connections. The concept of this study has involved the convergence of theory and practice; using a LIS graduate student as a conduit, projects have been undertaken that create learning objectives for not only the student, but the librarian(s) and LIS faculty member(s) involved for each individual project. The administrators of the Real Learning Connections have published* and presented on the different projects completed and what was learned from all parties involved. Each year new variables are added to the projects execution and the overall research goal is to create a sustainable internship model that fosters professional growth for students, organizational learning for practicing librarians and curriculum assessment and modification for the LIS department.

Speakers
NB

Nora Bird

University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States of America
avatar for Michael Crumpton

Michael Crumpton

Assistant Dean for Administrative Services,, UNC Greensboro
Michael Crumpton, MLS, SPHR is the Assistant Dean for Administrative Services at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He oversees administration of budgets, human resources and facilities; organizes and addresses space and remodeling issues; and works with grant and organizational development issues.  He is certified as a Senior Human Resources Professional and also holds a graduate certificate in Adult Teaching. His published works... Read More →


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Georgia 2/3

4:00pm

Session 3.1 B Juried Paper: Engaging Adjunct LIS Faculty as Educators through Communities of Practice
During the 2015-16 academic year, as part of a review and revision of master’s level curriculum, faculty in the School of Library and Information Management (SLIM) at Emporia State University began to formalize communities of practice (COPs) that include both fulltime and adjunct SLIM faculty. The formalization of these learning communities with the aim of providing opportunities for further curriculum development, but also, and equally importantly, increasing support for adjunct faculty, and creating learning communities in which all faculty may increase their content knowledge and pedagogical skill. In this presentation we will detail the benefits COPs have for LIS education by describing our experiences of creating COPs, the challenges we encountered and the solutions we have found to those challenges, as well as the theoretical framework in which our COPs are developing.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Sutton

Sarah Sutton

Assistant Professor of Library and Information Man, Emporia State University School of Library and Information Management


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Georgia 2/3

4:00pm

Session 3.1 C Juried Paper: Identifying the Key Stakeholders in LIS School’s Mission Statements: Who do we serve?
This research gathered the mission statements published online for 55 out of the 59 LIS schools accredited by the ALA in both the United States and Canada. The remaining four institutions did not have a formalized mission statement, or do not publish this statement in an online format (including the website and/or a digital file of such documents as an annual report). The mission statements were analyzed using a content analysis approach in which themes were identified regarding basic components of an effective, customer oriented mission statement highlighted by David et al. (2014). In cases where the organization had multiple statements (e.g. vision, mission, values, objectives, etc.) the mission statement was analyzed independent of the rest of the statements. Even if these statements should be related to one another, this study is focused on the specifics of the mission statement.

Speakers
MC

Monica Colon-Aguirre

Simmons College


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Georgia 2/3

4:00pm

Session 3.2 A Juried Paper: Discourses of Expertise in Professional Competency Documents: Communicating Across Communities
Professional expertise is examined and defined by multiple communities: researchers, instructors in professional education programs, and professional associations, among others. In this study, we examined how expertise in reference and information service (RIS) is framed by professional associations in their published competency documents. Taking a discourse analysis approach, we analyzed how professional associations articulate and frame expertise, bringing to light values, priorities, and hidden arguments embedded in the discourses. As instructors in professional education programs, we use competency documents in our courses and to inform our program goals, but it is critical to fully interrogate these documents before presenting them to students. As researchers, we may use these documents as frameworks or instruments, or our research may be influenced by these documents in more subtle ways, as professionals embrace the language of expertise that has been communicated to them by their profession.

Speakers
avatar for Amy VanScoy

Amy VanScoy

Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Atlanta 1

4:00pm

Session 3.2 B Juried Paper: Disconnect between local governance and community: the rise of volunteer-run libraries
Volunteer-run libraries in the United Kingdom (UK) represent a situation where the language of ‘community engagement’ is being used, but the meaning of the concept is being subverted. This research provides insight into a situation where government agencies and local municipalities are using the concept of ‘community engagement’ as a cover for reduction of public services.

Speakers
CB

Claire Burrows

PhD Candidate, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Claire Burrows is a second year PhD student in the Library and Information Science program at Western University. Her research pertains to the accessibility of academic libraries for students with disabilities, and how theoretical conceptualisations of disability may influence the development of library services.
HH

Heather Hill

The University of Western Ontario


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Atlanta 1

4:00pm

Session 3.2 C Juried Paper: Connecting Social Responsibility to Parental Health Information Behaviors: Questioning and Using Childhood Vaccination Information in Social Media
The goal of childhood immunization, as stated in Healthy People 2020, aims to improve vaccine coverage to 80 percent among children ages 19-35 months nationwide (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2016). Over the past decades, collaborative efforts have been made to advance children vaccination compliance including government recommendations and policies, national public health campaigns, and electronic tracking systems notification implemented to maintain electronic personal health record or patient portals. However, the 2014 measles outbreak of 667 cases from 27 states (CDC, 2016, para. 2) rekindled debates over the long-lasting social phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy or refusal, the so-called anti-vaccination movements. Those skeptics or vocal opponents of compulsory childhood vaccinations either question or believe that vaccines are dangerous to children. The anti-vaccine activists might act not only on the pure parental impulse to protect their children’s health, but also on different deep-rooted political, religious, or personal beliefs. A high rate of children’s vaccine exemption in the U.S. increases the likelihood of outbreaks of once eradicated diseases, amongst the most vulnerable public locations are across K-12 and college campuses.

Speakers

Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Georgia 2/3

4:00pm

Session 3.3 SIG: Historical Perspectives SIG: Patron Engagement Through Library Spaces, Collaborative Selection, and Storytelling
Paper 1: Designing spaces for literacy: Exploring collection development and use in early 20th century America

Paper 2: Community engagement in collection development: Social responsibility or professional abdication?

Paper 3: Storytelling for Social Justice: Classrooms, Communities and Everywhere in Between

Speakers
RC

Renate Chancellor

Catholic University of America
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →
SL

Shari Lee

St. John's University
JB

Jennifer Burek Pierce

University of Iowa
avatar for Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
I teach courses in information organization, library technical services, and social science information services. My research interests are related LIS careers and workforce, LIS history, and pedagogy,


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Atlanta 2

4:00pm

Session 3.4 SIG: Engaging Diverse Local Communities: Lessons from the Archives
Research has shown that archives are important resources within diverse communities (Caswell, 2014; Duff et al., 2013; Flinn & Shepherd, 2009). This important link between communities and archives has been borne out in the last few years as crucial events have been preserved by crowdsourcing vital information from the affected communities. Examples include The Documenting Ferguson Project(http://digital.wustl.edu/ferguson/), and the Preserve The Baltimore Uprising 2015 Archive Project (http://baltimoreuprising2015.org/about#aboutproject). Archival institutions throughout the city of Atlanta are valuable resources for researchers and community members. Panelists will share information on a variety of rich and diverse collections within each institution's holdings.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Cooke

Nicole Cooke

Assistant Professor, The School Information Sciences, University of Illinois
RK

Robin Kurz

Emporia State University


Wednesday January 18, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Atlanta 5

5:45pm

Past Presidents' Reception - By invitation only
By invitation only

Wednesday January 18, 2017 5:45pm - 7:00pm
Presidential Suite

6:00pm

Game Night
Join us in the unCommons for Uno, cards, Cards Against Humanity, and other board games.

Wednesday January 18, 2017 6:00pm - 10:00pm
Georgia 7/8
 
Thursday, January 19
 

7:30am

7:30am

7:30am

SIG Business Meetings

Archival/Preservation Education

Doctoral Students

Distance Education

Gender Issues

Information Ethics

Part-Time and Adjunct Faculty

Assistant/Associate Deans & Directors

School Library Media

Research


Thursday January 19, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Georgia 4-12

7:30am

Registration
Thursday January 19, 2017 7:30am - 6:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

Exhibits
Thursday January 19, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

unCommons
ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

Thursday January 19, 2017 8:00am - 6:00pm
Georgia 7/8

8:00am

Placement Services

Resumes/CVs and job descriptions are available both online and in binders located at the Placement Services area located in the Rooms 121, 123, 125, 127. A message board, and schedule of interview room assignments will also be available in the Placement Services area. Arrangements for interviews should be made directly between candidates and recruiters using the message board. Please check the board often.


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:00am - 8:00pm
Rooms 121/123

8:30am

ALISE Awards & Papers
ALISE/Eugene Garfield Doctoral Dissertation Competition

ALISE Research Grant, 2017 Preliminary Report 

ALISE / Connie Van Fleet Award for Research Excellence in Public Library Services to Adults 

Moderators
avatar for Xiaofeng Li

Xiaofeng Li

PhD Candidate, Rutgers University
I am a PhD candidate at Rutgers University in the area of Library and Information Science with ABD status. My dissertation examines young people’s information practices and collaboration in informal learning environments, especially an after-school technology club in a school library makerspace and a public library makerspace.

Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Georgia 2/3

8:30am

Session 4.4 Juried Panel: Makerspaces in Libraries: Creating Change through Active Partnerships with Communities

This panel will discuss how libraries promote active community engagement through Makerspaces. A Makerspace is a place for community members to engage in creative making activities in a range of domains, offering access to fabrication technologies and social opportunities with other Makers. Community engagement is the key to success. Several library Makerspaces are currently practicing innovative approaches to engaging their communities. However, there seems to be a lack of consensus regarding what social responsibilities library Makerspaces must assume in today’s society. The panel proposes the following overarching questions:

  • What social responsibilities do Makerspaces in a library have to their community?
  • What are some of the effective ways Makerspaces currently practice to engage community?
  • What should LIS educators and researchers do to promote community engagement and social responsibility in and through library Makerspaces?

 

 

The five research projects featured in this panel answer these questions, presenting innovative approaches to community engagement. The presentations will explore how Makerspaces meet the needs of community members regardless of location through mobile Makerspaces, methods for reaching out and supporting underserved populations, including court-involved teens, as well as the development of young people’s social responsibilities and critical technical practices. The panel also includes suggestions for LIS researchers and educators regarding a research approach to engaging communities and competencies for Makerspace professionals that must be cultivated in LIS higher education.

The panel will begin with a brief introduction connecting practices in Makerspaces to this year’s conference theme (5 minutes). A presentation on each project will follow (10 minutes per project). During the final 35 minutes the presenters will engage with the audience, opening the floor to questions and discussions about the implications for LIS educators and researchers.


Speakers
JA

June Abbas

University of Oklahoma
LB

Leanne Bowler

University of Pittsburgh
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma
avatar for Heather Moorefield-Lang

Heather Moorefield-Lang

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
Heather is an assistant professor for the School of Library and Information Science at The University of South Carolina. She is the former chair of the AASL Best Websites for Teaching and Learning Committee. The focus of her research is in technology in libraries and schools with a current emphasis on maker spaces in libraries and education. To learn more about her work, follow her on Twitter @actinginthelib or visit her website... Read More →
avatar for Rebekah Willett

Rebekah Willett

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
I currently teach courses on young adult literature, multicultural literature for children and young adults, pedagogy, informational divides, and online participatory cultures. I have conducted research on children’s media cultures, focusing on issues of gender, play, literacy, and learning. My publications include work on playground games, amateur camcorder cultures, young people’s online activities, and children’s story writing. My... Read More →


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 3

8:30am

Session 4.2 A Juried Paper: Partnering with the LIS Community to Design Curriculum for Development of Management Skills in Information Professionals
The library and information science (LIS) profession is currently navigating through a protracted period of change fueled by rapid technological innovation. The changing nature of information and its distribution and the growth of online education is correspondingly impacting community expectations for libraries. These societal changes require that LIS graduates are equipped with new workforce skills needed by employers (ALA, 2014). The evolving demand for workforce skills have often been a topic of discussion at ALISE, American Library Association (ALA), and other professional LIS conferences and meetings.

Speakers
avatar for James Vorbach

James Vorbach

Director, DLIS, St. John's University


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 4.2 B Juried Paper: A Community of Practice Learning Framework Approach to Teaching the Foundations of Library and Information Science
Many library and information science (LIS) programs offer a foundations course as part of the curriculum. Sometimes, however, both students and instructors struggle with the course; students because it is frequently perceived as the “intro” course that they must “get through” and instructors because it can be a very difficult course to teach as it must address many areas that are often not specific to one faculty member’s expertise. Common misperceptions by students include the idea that it is comprised of an unconnected mishmash of topics, contains nothing but theory and boring historical facts, and has no practical components or relevance to their future work. Given these negative perceptions and teaching difficulties it is not surprising that some programs have opted to do away with the course altogether. Yet, given the right circumstances, this course can go a long way to helping new students gain vital knowledge and understanding of, for what is for the vast majority of them, a completely new discipline. What is needed is a framework that helps instructors not only to frame the content in a way that makes it meaningful and relevant to students but also helps to further motivate learning by conveying the content in a compelling manner. The community of practice (CoP) learning framework can provide this much-needed guidance.

Speakers
avatar for Valerie Nesset

Valerie Nesset

Associate Professor, University at Buffalo (SUNY)
Information literacy instruction for elementary school students; intergenerational participatory design; indexing for children; visualization techniques for children


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 4.2 C Juried Paper: Scaffolding an LIS Educational Partnership: The UMD Libraries Research & Teaching Fellowship
The University of Maryland Libraries has longstanding MLIS graduate student teacher program. Reaching as far back as 1999, MLIS students have carried more than 75% of the libraries’ general education information literacy instruction load. Despite its overall success, this program left much to be desired. On top of a heavy teaching load, graduate students hired into these hourly positions were provided low levels of training, often working in isolation separated from their peers and other librarians. The passive learning environment also impacted undergraduate students. As a result of the low-levels of teacher training, information literacy sessions were formatted as easy to deliver and skill-based lectures. Rather than the development of critical thinking and information literacy, undergraduate students were taught how to access specific materials and format citations. The graduate students leading the sessions were divorced from the teaching process, delivering instruction from a standardized script and slide-deck.

The proposed paper will provide a description of the fellowship program, rationale for its design, and address the challenges and opportunities of creating a partnership between an LIS program and an academic library. The speakers, who represent both the libraries and the iSchool, will provide a holistic overview of the design, implementation, and on-going maintenance of the fellowship. It will conclude by sharing the results from this program’s first three cohorts, including job placement rates for graduating fellows, feedback from participants, reflections from librarians and administrators on the process, and lessons learned from fellowship directors. At the end of the presentation/paper, attendees will have the information and materials needed to replicate a similar program at their home institutions, including a semester-by-semester breakdown of activities and readings, weekly discussion questions, peer teaching observation forms, workshop ideas, and teacher training tools.


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 4.3 A Juried Paper: This is What Democracy Looks Like: Analyzing the Tweets of Teachers with a Deweyan Lens

As education reform in the US continues to make headlines, researchers work toward understanding how these changes impact the lives of teachers, students, and society. This paper outlines the findings of an interdisciplinary study conducted by information scientists, educators, and computer scientists that explores how the tweets of teachers are contributing to this conversation. Using a dataset comprised of almost one million tweets, we explore whether and how teachers are using Twitter as a space to discuss the profession and politics of teaching. To explore these questions using “big data”, we employ a Deweyian lens developed through a reading of his seminal work, Democracy and Education (1997/1916) that outlines a vision for educational practice for social change. Specifically, we explore the following questions:

  • Are teachers developing community on Twitter, per Dewey?

  • How can teachers’ use of Twitter be read through Dewey’s joint concepts of democracy and education?

  • What are some challenges to democratic discussion of educational issues on Twitter?



Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 2

8:30am

Session 4.3 B Juried Paper: Listening to a Diverse Community to Create an Inclusive Understanding of Reference & Information Service

The community of information professionals represents a broad range of identities, abilities, and talents. While they may still be underrepresented in the profession, librarians from diverse groups should still be contributing their perspective to theory development and best practices. To complement existing research in reference and information service (RIS) that focuses on the behavioral aspects of RIS, it is important to conduct research on the practitioner perspective of RIS to identify the thoughts and feelings that motivate these behaviors. Study of the practitioner perspective must include a diverse group of professionals in order to develop an inclusive understanding of RIS for practitioners. However, professionals representing diverse racial/ethnic groups can be difficult to access because they represent a minority of professionals -- making up only 12% of library professionals in the United States (American Library Association, 2012). As such, all of the voices of the diverse community of practitioners are not often heard.

 

The aims of the study are

  • to understand the experience of RIS for professionals whose voices have not been heard
  • to explore whether and how these professionals’ experience of difference affects their RIS practice

This study specifically focuses on the experience of RIS for librarians of color. Through a qualitative, phenomenological study, the voice of professionals that have not yet contributed to an understanding of RIS will be heard. This study is an effort to reach beyond librarians from the majority group and to create an inclusive understanding of RIS.


Speakers
avatar for Amy VanScoy

Amy VanScoy

Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 2

8:30am

Session 4.3 C Juried Paper: Learning analytics in the library and the emergence of professional ethics conflicts
Big Data has arrived in college campuses and classrooms by way of learning analytics (LA) initiatives. LA is the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs” (Siemens, 2012, p. 4). To date, LA advocates have tracked and analyzed student behaviors in data-heavy environments, such as online courses in learning management systems (LMS). As proponents ask new questions about the uses of LA, academic libraries are considering their role in tracking and acting on analyzable flows of student data. However, LA comes with moral and ethical problems related to students’ intellectual privacy and intellectual freedom. LA may also create unfair benefits for intellectual property creators, harming students as consumers. Libraries must therefore consider how particular LA initiatives contradict ethical principles set forth in the American Library Association’s (2008) “Code of Ethics.”

Speakers
avatar for Dorothea Salo

Dorothea Salo

Faculty Associate, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Salo teaches organization of information, library technology, scholarly communication and library publishing, and research-data management for the ALA-accredited iSchool at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also a librarian specializing in research-data management, digital preservation, and scholarly communication.


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 2

8:30am

Session 4.1 SIG: Archival/Preservation Education SIG Panel: Connecting to Community: Curriculum and Projects for Family History Collaborative Services
Family history’s popularity increasingly brings visitors to local cultural heritage sites and online digital collections with expectations of instant genealogical and historical information and innovative, digital interfaces. In the digital age, optimal products and services for family information are often best achieved through collaborative efforts across a variety of information settings, including municipal collections. This panel presents models for successful preparation of graduate students for future work with family history services, with emphasis on reference services, programming, outreach, and community collaboration. A discussion period welcomes debates on best practices and desired outcomes in family history information services education.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Bossaller

Jenny Bossaller

Associate Professor, University of Missouri
avatar for Rhonda L. Clark

Rhonda L. Clark

Associate Professor of Information and Library Science, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
I hold a Ph.D. in Russian History ( Univ. MN 1996) and an MLIS from the Univ. of Pittsburgh, 2007. I have been teaching in the MSLS program at Clarion University since 2009. We recently introduced a new concentration in Local and Archival Studies, intended to prepare our graduates to work with local special collections across a variety of different cultural heritage settings. I have a recent book out with co-author Nicole Wedemeyer Miller... Read More →
avatar for Heather Moulaison Sandy

Heather Moulaison Sandy

Assistant Professor, University of Missouri


Thursday January 19, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 4

10:00am

Morning Break
Thursday January 19, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

10:30am

Session 5.4 Juried Panel: Information Services, Technology, and Community Values in LIS Research and Education: What the 2015 Catastrophic Flooding in SC Tells Us
This panel presentation showcases research conducted by faculty of the School of Library and Information Science at the University of South Carolina after the state’s catastrophic flooding in October 2015. LIS researchers take social responsibility, through their research, to help local communities examine all aspects of community experiences. The topics underscore how well positioned the information studies are to investigate community engagement. The results of these studies will be integrated into the SLIS curricula. Recommendations will also be made to the library systems and local and federal governments for the improvement of community engagement and services.

Speakers
CC

Clayton Copeland

University of South Carolina, United States of America
avatar for Samantha Hastings

Samantha Hastings

University of South Carolina
Every day is another chance to leave it better than you found it! | | i wake up every morning grateful for my clean, warm bed, running water and my own refrigerator (even if it is empty!)
avatar for Amir Karami

Amir Karami

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
I'm currently an Assistant Professor at the School of Library and Information Science and a Faculty Associate at the South Carolina SmartState Center for Healthcare Quality (CHQ) at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. My research focuses on text\data mining techniques to create new models and applications in medical, health, social science, and cyber security domains. |
avatar for Md. Hassan Zamir

Md. Hassan Zamir

Doctoral Candidate, University of South Carolina, United States of America


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 3

10:30am

Session 5.1 A Juried Paper: Practicing Provenance Research: Using Situated Learning Theory to Connect Students to the University LAM Community
This paper reports on a course project designed to meaningfully connect students in University of Pittsburgh’s Library and Information Science program with the University’s “LAM” (Library, Archive, and Museum) community. In the 2015 and 2016 summer terms, students in a graduate course titled Museum Archives conducted semester-long provenance research projects, investigating the ownership history of art objects and rare materials in the University Art Gallery and University Library System’s collections. Designed with Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger’s (1991) theory of situated learning in mind, this project facilitated students’ real-life experience with provenance research in order to deepen their understanding of records that document an object’s identity and “itinerary through history” (Feigenbaum & Reist, 2012, p. 2). This paper discusses the provenance research project and the context of the University of Pittsburgh’s LAM community and introduces Lave and Wenger’s conceptualization of situated learning. We articulate the characteristics of the project design that led to a successful learning experience for the students and an effective partnership among the LAM units involved with the goal of providing ideas for instructors considering the integration of an experiential project into coursework.

Speakers
avatar for Eleanor Mattern

Eleanor Mattern

University of Pittsburgh


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia 2/3

10:30am

Session 5.1 B Juried Paper: Media Smart Libraries: Building Community Partnerships to Enhance Digital Media Literacies
Media Smart Libraries brings together the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Library and Information Studies (GSLIS) in partnership with the Providence Children's Film Festival and the Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services on a two-year, IMLS-funded project designed to advance the digital and media literacy competencies of children, teens, and families in our communities. Through public programs, continuing education workshops, and curriculum revision, the MSL team is working with Rhode Island school and public libraries, nonprofits, state library agencies, and library experts across the country to improve digital literacy across Rhode Island. This IMLS-funded project includes curriculum revision, public programs, continuing education workshops, and a digital badging system, all of which thrive on active partnerships with the Rhode Island library and nonprofit communities to manage and create change in the area of digital media literacies. This paper will focus on the curricular efforts stemming from the grant, both for the MLIS degree program at GSLIS and for our professional development programs.

Speakers
AB

Allison Barker

University of Rhode Island, United States of America
VK

Valerie Karno

University of Rhode Island, United States of America
avatar for Lauren H. Mandel

Lauren H. Mandel

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island, United States of America
MH

Mary H. Moen

University of Rhode Island, United States of America
AT

Alyssa Taft

University of Rhode Island, United States of America


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia 2/3

10:30am

Session 5.1 C Juried Paper: Factors Influencing the Intention of Students to Continue Using e-Books: Recommendations for Academic Libraries to Better Engage with Students
e-Books are becoming increasingly popular among students across the country. Academic libraries serve as one of the main sources for students to access and use e-Books. e-Books represent one of the most environmental friendly modes of learning in the 21st century. Hence, it is a social responsibility of academic libraries to manage student interest and usage of e-Books.

The goal of this original research conducted with 279 undergraduate students at a landgrant university in South was to: (a) study the factors influencing the behavioral intention of students to continue using e-Books, and (b) inform academic libraries for managing the student interest and usage of e-Books.

Speakers
KD

Kanchan Deosthali

Assistant Professor, College of Business, University of Mary Washington
avatar for Devendra Potnis

Devendra Potnis

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
My interdisciplinary research focuses on the application of information and communication technologies (e.g., e-Books, mobile apps, information systems, websites, etc.) for the development of society (including libraries), governments, and businesses. In particular, my research projects study the adoption of ICTs by individuals and organizations like libraries and US small businesses, information behavior of disadvantaged communities in the... Read More →
avatar for Awa Zhu

Awa Zhu

Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
Dr. Xiaohua (Awa) Zhu is an assistant professor at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Zhu's research focuses on e-resources licensing and management, access rights, digital copyright, open government, and academic libraries.


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia 2/3

10:30am

Session 5.2 A Juried Paper: From Conceptual Model to Toolkit Blueprint Design in Action Research to Further Community Engagement between Small Businesses and Rural Public Libraries: Implications for LIS Education to Promote Economic Development in Tenness
What role can library and information science (LIS) education play in economic development and support small businesses while engaging with them in a specific regional community and cultural setting? This paper explores answers to the question by focusing on Tennessee and investigating how LIS educators can extend their social responsibility to the state’s small businesses and rural public libraries. Potential directions discussed within a research and grant context include curriculum design, classroom integration of appropriate small business information content areas based on the needs of small businesses and rural public libraries, and the training of rural library and information professionals to further small business service delivery and resource development. The paper also shares insights during the process of conceptual model development to toolkit blueprint design in action research for LIS educators to further community engagement between small businesses and rural public libraries in Tennessee. It is based on experiences during a planning grant entitled “The Role of Rural Public Libraries in Small Business Economic Development in the Appalachian Region: A Case Study of Tennessee” (PLSB-TN) that was recently awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ National Leadership Grants for Libraries (Research Category) (October 2014 – September 2016) to the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee (URL: http://scholar.cci.utk.edu/plsb-tn). PLSB-TN is serving as a pilot case study and assessment test-bed to expand strategies for the entire Appalachian region and other rural environments in the future.

Speakers
BW

Bradley Wade Bishop

University of Tennessee, Knoxville
avatar for Bharat Mehra

Bharat Mehra

University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Dr. Mehra's research examines diversity and intercultural communication, social justice in library and information science (LIS), critical and cross-cultural studies, and community informatics or the use of information and communication technologies to empower minority and underserved populations. He has applied action research towards community building and community development activities while collaborating with racial/ethnic groups... Read More →


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 1

10:30am

Session 5.2 B Juried Paper: Is the public library in the Blue Zone? Socially Responsible Nudging to promote Community Engagement in Planned Community Health Initiatives

There is widespread desire for extended longevity, provided it coincides with healthy, youthful years (Donner, Fortney, Calimport, Pfleger, Shah, & Betts-LaCroix, 2016; Lang, Baltes, & Wagner, 2007). Socially responsible strategies promoting public encourage community engagement. A recent public/private partnership approach began as a National Geographic expedition to find the longest living cultures evolved into a recipe for living longer (Blue Zones, 2014; 2016). Blue Zones (BZs) project is an organized social movement in select American communities to replicate BZs healthy lifestyle principles and longevity. Three states (Hawaii, Iowa, and Oregon) and four communities in California, Florida, Minnesota, and Texas have committed to become a target BZ (Buettner, 2008; 2015). Aside from the BZ infrastructure, what is the role of the public library in community engagement and adoption of a healthy lifestyle in planned community health initiatives?

 

Government involvement in personal health issues has been met with resistance (Leonard, 2011; Mor, 2015; Palmer, 1999). The involvement of local government in the BZ initiative opens the door to criticism and speculation by community members (Leonor, 2015). Despite its governmentally funded status, public libraries are socially responsible to their communities for providing unbiased information, space for gathering, and a commitment to engaging citizens from all walks of the community. Collections alone pose problems as information overload poses challenges to community engagement in planned healthy communities. Services such as information sessions, project demonstrations, and subject-specific resources add to the information overload phenomenon. Lankes (2012) statement calls for building communities through libraries. Despite the increasing popularity of BZs in the research and practice of public health promotion and social policy, no research has been conducted by LIS scholars to examine the effect of information provision and use in the context of the five BZs, specifically as it relates to the role of the public library.



Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 1

10:30am

Session 5.2 C Juried Paper: The boundary work of public librarianship
Examining the information interactions between public librarians and homeless library users, this study explores how public librarians create, navigate, and question their professional boundaries. Boundary work that examines issues in the professions has an enduring history in sociological theory. Boundary work is a social construct that has to do with constituting, negotiating, and breaking boundaries between abstract fields of knowledge. Gieryn (1983) came up with the term ‘boundary work’ when demarcating what constitutes science and non-science. In his 1983 article, Gieryn describes what science is, and what science is not. He uses descriptions of ‘science’ and ‘science as not-x or y’ to demonstrate the ways in which boundaries are created to delineate what a domain of knowledge is and is not. Gieryn (1983) further argues that threats to the professions are struggles over boundaries, which are often rooted in conflicting or evolving ideological issues.

Speakers
RW

Rachel Williams

University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States of America


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 1

10:30am

Session 5.5 A Juried Paper: Educating Creative Minds: Do Our Pedagogical Practices foster Meaningful Community Engagement?
This presentation will engage the audience in collective self-reflection and address two communities: the community of “us”—LIS educators—and the community of our students. The talk will focus on our social responsibility to educate a new generation of LIS practitioners and scholars who will be able to implement change and to find effective ways to disrupt and revise outdated practices. The current fast-paced and ever-evolving LIS environment needs creative minds. 

Speakers

Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 4

10:30am

Session 5.5 B Juried Paper: Teaching Community Engagement
America’s founding fathers proclaimed the necessity of an informed citizenry. But information alone does not guarantee citizen participation. Information and engagement must work together. Engagement marks a critical point where community and individual information needs intersect. Community engagement refers to the multiple ways that we learn about, collaborate with, and support community members. Typical activities include facilitating community conversations, assessing community aspirations and concerns, involving community members in decision-making, partnering to advance shared goals, promoting civic literacy, convening forums for dialogue and deliberation, and engaging with diverse historic and cultural experiences of constituents.


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 4

10:30am

Session 5.5 C Juried Paper: Impacting Schools and Communities through LIS Instruction on Action-Based Research
Library educators are challenged to weave research experiences into pre-service coursework that afford a mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge designed to improve practice and impact change on the community. This study evaluates the current requirements of a Master’s paper and its place situated as the capstone experience in a program of study. Shared in this study are the process used for course redevelopment and findings of a semester using a redesigned course employing action research in libraries and communities to improve practice.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth A. Burns

Elizabeth A. Burns

Assistant Professor, Old Dominion University
avatar for Jeffrey DiScala

Jeffrey DiScala

PhD Candidate, University of Maryland, United States of America
SK

Sue Kimmel

Associate Professor, Old Dominion University
Ask me about earning a PhD in curriculum and instruction.


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 4

10:30am

Session 5.3 SIG: Making International Connections: Expanding Awareness of Non-North American LIS Education
While LIS education in North America likely remains among the best resourced in the world it is easy for educators and practitioners alike to confuse this circumstance with always “leading the way.” The co-conveners assembled and reviewed a current list of courses explicitly designed to address “international” LIS education (“international” meaning non-North American). This review determined that during the past several years nearly half of currently accredited American Library Association Library and Information Studies master's level programs in the United States and Canada began offering courses and seminars in international practice. These courses range in topics from comparative and cross-cultural practice, to notions of international professionalism, innovation, and challenges currently besetting library and archival studies in non-North American LIS education programs.

Speakers will include Dr. Yuelin Li, Professor and Associate Dean, Chair, Department of Information Resources Management; Business School, Nankai University (Asia); Dr. Shanju Lin Chang, Professor and Past Director, Department of Library and Information Science, National Taiwan University (Asia); Prof Terry Weech, Univ of Ill at Urbana-Champaign (Eastern Europe); Dr. Charlotte Ford, Library Director Birmingham-Southern College and Assoc. Prof (Central/Latin America); and Dr. Mary Anne Kennan, Associate Head of School Information Studies Charles Sturt University (Australia/Oceania). 

Speakers
avatar for Denice Adkins

Denice Adkins

Associate Professor, SISLT, University of Missouri
avatar for Anthony Bernier

Anthony Bernier

San Jose State Univeristy
Public library services and history, YA, critical theory, LIS accreditation.
avatar for Rong Tang

Rong Tang

Associate Professor and Director, Simmons GSLIS Usability Lab, Simmons College
Usability evaluation and user behavior research


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 2

10:30am

Session 5.6 SIG: Practitioner input in curriculum design: Is our present model working?

While it is recognized that library and information graduates are still required to be taught core theories, knowledge, and skills while at university, employers are increasingly demanding them to have additional skills to enable them to function as competent information professionals (Stephens & Hamblin, 2006, p. 224). A study on perceived preparedness of recent graduates by Creel and Pollicino (2012) still supports this. They surveyed both recent MLS graduates and practitioners. It revealed that there are still larger gaps between the two sides and suggested service learning projects and course work may need to be reexamined within the curriculum.

In a panel discussion at the ALISE 2016 Conference, Abbas, Garnar, Kennedy, Kenney, Luo, and Stephens (2016) concluded that research is necessary to inform LIS education and practice but that numerous barriers place constraints on this process (p. 94). One of those barriers is that there is a need to establish relationships with practitioners and to involve them in the research. Because they are not frequently involved in research, the focus may not be on issues important to practitioners.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Crumpton

Michael Crumpton

Assistant Dean for Administrative Services,, UNC Greensboro
Michael Crumpton, MLS, SPHR is the Assistant Dean for Administrative Services at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He oversees administration of budgets, human resources and facilities; organizes and addresses space and remodeling issues; and works with grant and organizational development issues.  He is certified as a Senior Human Resources Professional and also holds a graduate certificate in Adult Teaching. His published works... Read More →
avatar for YooJin Ha

YooJin Ha

Assicuate Professor, Clarion University
avatar for Linda L. Lillard

Linda L. Lillard

Associate Professor and Department Chair and Program Director, Clarion University
avatar for Cecilia L. Salvatore

Cecilia L. Salvatore

Associate Professor & Coordinator/Archives & Cultural Heritage Program, Dominican University


Thursday January 19, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Atlanta 5

12:15pm

Awards Luncheon
Come celebrate the ALISE award winners during this complimentary luncheon.

Thursday January 19, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Georgia

2:00pm

OCLC/ALISE Grant Papers
OCLC/ALISE Grant Papers

Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Georgia 2/3

2:00pm

Session 6.3 Juried Panel: Community Connections and Collaborations: Stories, Strategies, and Relationship Building
Libraries have consistently functioned as gathering places, often serving as community centers for their constituents (McCleer, 2013). As organizations, one of their main roles is to know who their stakeholders are and ascertain how to serve them (Taylor, Jaeger, McDermott, Kodama, & Bertot, 2011). Among ALA’s core values, libraries are designated as “open, inclusive, and collaborative environment[s]” that promote “social responsibility and the public good” (2016, para. 3). To impart these values to future librarians and information professionals, it is crucial for faculty to engage with their communities and to involve students in their work.
The purpose of this session is to share ideas among attendees to learn about others’ programs, outreach, and research that address and involve communities.

Speakers
JA

June Abbas

University of Oklahoma
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma
BV

Betsy Van der Veer Martens

University of Oklahoma, United States of America
Associate Professor at the University of Oklahoma School of Library & Information Studies


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 2

2:00pm

Session 6.2 A Juried Paper: Multimedia Approaches to Learning
This paper identifies, analyzes, and critiques three multimedia resources for learning about the foundations of Library and Information Science (LIS). Multimedia pedagogical strategies have many benefits. They overcome a long-standing reliance upon read-write learning; can be economically reused; are student-centered (allowing greater personal control); and extend seamlessly beyond classroom walls.


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 1

2:00pm

Session 6.2 B Juried Paper: Teaching JavaScript as Social Justice: Interrogating Culture, Bias and Equity in an Introductory Programming Course
Our students need to develop an understanding of issues of culture, bias and equity at the same time that they learn technical skills, like programming. There are compelling ethical and practical reasons why information professionals have a responsibility to understand the organizations and communities in which we use programming skills (Forsgren & Humble, 2016; Sinclair, 2004; Wajcman, 2009; Wolske, Rhinesmith & Kumar, 2014). We don’t teach reference services, project management or cataloging isolated from their organizational and culture contexts, and we should similarly be teaching programming in its cultural context. Unfortunately there are few examples of courses that integrate these themes in a meaningful way. This reflects an ongoing challenge in LIS education to meaningfully engage curricula with issues of diversity, inclusion and equity.

Speakers

Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 1

2:00pm

Session 6.2 C Juried Paper: How Do you Teach a Maker Librarian?: Makerspaces in Schools of Library Science
A maker space is defined as a location where students and patrons can participate in active learning. They can create, play, questions, problem solve, and build (Preddy, 2013). Empirical research on makerspaces in libraries to date is ever-growing but still limited. The topic of makerspaces is still more commonly discussed in popular writing venues like magazines, trade publication, and blogs. Research on training, professional development, and coursework in makerspaces is higher in scarcity. While maker learning spaces continue to increase in libraries finding training opportunities problematic, project ideas difficult to locate, and peers with makerspaces hard to pinpoint.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Moorefield-Lang

Heather Moorefield-Lang

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
Heather is an assistant professor for the School of Library and Information Science at The University of South Carolina. She is the former chair of the AASL Best Websites for Teaching and Learning Committee. The focus of her research is in technology in libraries and schools with a current emphasis on maker spaces in libraries and education. To learn more about her work, follow her on Twitter @actinginthelib or visit her website... Read More →


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 1

2:00pm

Session 6.1 SIG: Leveraging Educator-Practitioner Partnerships to Define Competencies for Technical Services Professionals
Core competencies documents provide guidance for practitioners, managers, and educators on the different types of knowledge, skills, and behaviors that new professionals should have or strive to obtain. In 2015-2016, LIS educators and practitioners collaborated via the ACLTS division of ALA to define competencies and assess education needs in technical services. The Cataloging Competencies Task Force, formed by the ALA ALCTS Competencies & Education for a Career in Cataloging Interest Group, created the draft Core Competencies for Professional Catalogers. The Education Working Group, charged by Acquisitions Section of ALCTS with analyzing current activities supporting education in acquisitions, recommended the development of a competencies document for acquisitions librarians.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
I teach courses in information organization, library technical services, and social science information services. My research interests are related LIS careers and workforce, LIS history, and pedagogy,
avatar for Karen Snow

Karen Snow

Associate Professor, Dominican University
I teach cataloging, classification, and metadata courses and I am the PhD program director.


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 5

2:00pm

Session 6.4 SIG: Trends in the Ethics of Community Engagement
Information ethics can provide practical guidance for communities seeking to implement information systems in socially responsible ways. As advances in information technologies bring new services to more people it is important for awareness of ethical standards to keep pace. This session presents three ethical considerations relevant to LIS educators: ethics of care in public internet access facilities, the ethics of local big data infrastructures, and trends in copyright and intellectual property in online communities. Taken together, these presentations provide a cross-section of ways ethics continue to clarify the relationship between the field and the practice of library and information science.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →
LF

Lesley Farmer

Professor and Program Coordinator, CSU
I coordinate the librarianship program at CSULB, and manage the CSU ICT Literacy project. My research interests are digital citizenship, literacies, assessment, and collaboration. See my website http://k12digitalcitizenship.wikispaces.com and http://cyberfamilies.blogspot.com
avatar for Emily J. M. Knox

Emily J. M. Knox

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois
avatar for Colin Rhinesmith

Colin Rhinesmith

Assistant Professor, Simmons College
Colin Rhinesmith is an assistant professor in the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons College. He is also a faculty research fellow with the Benton Foundation and a faculty associate with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.
avatar for Miriam E. Sweeney

Miriam E. Sweeney

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
Researching intersections of race, gender, and technology; critical cultural informatics; Internet and digital media studies; social justice and LIS.


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 3

2:00pm

Session 6.5 SIG: School Library Media SIG: School Libraries, Community Involvement, and Social Responsibility
This panel session will begin with presentations exploring how school libraries and school library education programs increase opportunities for experiential, service oriented, and community-engaged student learning. The presentations will be followed by an interactive round-table discussion, during which participants will interact with panelists regarding issues raised by the papers, implications for practice, and future areas for research.

Speakers
BP

Brenda Pruitt-Annisette

Chicago State University


Thursday January 19, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Atlanta 4

3:30pm

Afternoon Break
Thursday January 19, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

3:30pm

4:00pm

ALISE Business Meeting
Thursday January 19, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Georgia

4:00pm

5:00pm

ALISE Kick-Off to 2018
Thursday January 19, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Georgia

7:00pm

Doctoral Student Research Poster Session and Reception
hors d’oeuvres and cash bar

Thursday January 19, 2017 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Capitol
 
Friday, January 20
 

7:30am

7:30am

SIG Business Meetings

New Faculty

Historical Perspectives

Multicultural, Ethnic, and Humanistic Concern

Technical Services Education

Curriculum

Development and Fundraising

Information Policy

International Library Education

Innovative Pedagogies

Youth Services


Friday January 20, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Georgia 4-12

7:30am

Registration
Friday January 20, 2017 7:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

8:00am

Placement Services

Resumes/CVs and job descriptions are available both online and in binders located at the Placement Services area. A message board, and schedule of interview room assignments will also be available in the Placement Services area. Arrangements for interviews should be made directly between candidates and recruiters using the message board. Please check the board often.


Friday January 20, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
Rooms 121/123

8:00am

unCommons
ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

Friday January 20, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
Georgia 7/8

8:30am

Session 7.4 Juried Panel: Sustaining Community Engagement and Fostering Social Responsibility: Teaching and Learning about Diversity in LIS Programs
With the increasing community orientation of LIS practice and scholarship, the debate on the role of diversity education takes center stage. The very idea of community engagement in such complex multicultural societies as the U.S. and Canada is inextricably linked to educating a new generation of professionals who are culturally competent, knowledgeable, and well-equipped for dealing with diverse individuals and community groups. Yet, with a few exceptions, education for diversity is not an integral part of the LIS curriculum. Course offerings are limited; the definition of diversity is often narrow and does not encompass a variety of life experiences. 

Speakers
avatar for Denice Adkins

Denice Adkins

Associate Professor, SISLT, University of Missouri
avatar for Nadia Caidi

Nadia Caidi

University of Toronto
avatar for Nicole Cooke

Nicole Cooke

Assistant Professor, The School Information Sciences, University of Illinois
TS

Toni Samek

University of Alberta


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 4

8:30am

Session 7.1 A Juried Paper: Coming to Voice: Black Feminist theoretical frame in Community-Based Information Environments
In 1963, Frances Cummings, an African-American mother and resident of Chicago Public Housing voiced to city officials the need for her neighborhood to have a library. She asserted that the lack of access to a library center would hinder community education. She spoke boldly about the city’s poor planning and lack of insight in public housing communities ("Blast City for Lack of Near Southside Library”, 1963). Frances Cummings was a representative speaker of a group of organized mothers seeking equity of access and justice by using their voices collectively to shed light on the disregard of their community. The nearly eight-year struggle of these women exemplifies what Belenky, Bond, & Weinstock (1999) call the tradition that has no name. Women in this tradition, who are on the margins and designated as ‘other’ come to voice. This presentation will illuminate theoretically the metaphor of voice (Belenky et. al., 1999; Collins, 1998; hooks, 1990; Lorde, 2007) in the context of African-American activist-mothers’ organizing network and recognition of information inaccessibility. It is informed by a case of women fighting for library facilities in 1960’s Chicago public housing (Gray, 2015). The case provides the community view of information access while revealing the influence of informal information community networks. The presentation explores theoretically the concept of voice, examines voice in the African-American female activist tradition, highlights the complexity of the strategic usage of voice within the context of social capital (Williams & Durrance, 2008; Domínguez & Watkins, 2003), and presents a proposed theoretical frame for the collective Black Feminist (Collins, 2000) voice within community-based information environments.

Speakers
avatar for LaVerne Gray

LaVerne Gray

PhD Candidate, University of Tennessee Knoxville


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Georgia 2/3

8:30am

Session 7.1 B Juried Paper: An LGBT Community Defines and Builds Information Sources to Fulfill Overlooked Social Needs
As a professor in a library information science program, I pursue community engagement and social responsibility goals in line with my home institution’s mission, that of Chicago State University. For me, this currently entails promoting the teaching of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) history as it has often been overlooked or deliberately ignored in information resources for high school students. A lack of information in this area leads to a serious distortion of the understanding of the contemporary LGBT community. This paper explores how my efforts in LGBT history education lead to goals, which in turn facilitate joint efforts between my university and its academic library, with community and student organizations. These efforts create a space for the creation and use of information sources (some of which are quite unusual), and key library skills.

Speakers

Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Georgia 2/3

8:30am

Session 7.1 C Juried Paper: “How do I do this right?”: Insider/outsider dynamics and information practices of LGBTQ+ individuals

This research employs socio-cultural approaches to LIS in examining the information practices of cultural outsiders – lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals. It explores how insider/outsider status is assigned within LGBTQ+ communities and its impact on members’ information practices. Chatman (1999) defines community as a “world in which ways of looking at things are in accordance with agreed-upon standards” and suggests the potential of community in fostering one’s sense of self (p. 211). However, the functions of community can also yield negative outcomes by limiting possibilities and perspectives of what constitutes legitimate information and information practices (Chatman, 1999). Along with examining the multivalent influences of community on the information practices of LGBTQ+ individuals, this research also explores implications for the social responsibility of libraries in fostering communities inclusive of LGBTQ+ individuals. The study addresses the following research questions:

RQ1. What are the information practices of LGBTQ+ individuals within communities?

RQ2. How do insider/outsider dynamics affect LGBTQ+ information practices within communities?

RQ3. Based on the effect of insider/outsider community dynamics on the information practices of LGBTQ+ individuals, how can libraries promote inclusivity as socially responsible institutions?


Speakers
avatar for Vanessa L. Kitzie

Vanessa L. Kitzie

Ph.D. Candidate, Rutgers University
avatar for Marie L. Radford

Marie L. Radford

Professor & Director, PhD Program, Rutgers University, NJ
Research interest in interpersonal communication, assessment, virtual reference, qualitative methods, & postmodern approaches to librarian, library, and research process stereotypes.


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Georgia 2/3

8:30am

Session 7.2 A Juried Paper: Assessing the reproductive health-related information-seeking behavior of low-income women as it is influenced by self-perception of risk and perceived barriers

In the United States there is still a considerable deficit in the reproductive health of poor women. This deficit manifests in many ways that negatively affect both women and their children. Despite the profound amount of literature detailing both the lack and the consequences of the disparity of reproductive healthcare suffered by low-income women, there exists a gap in the research deciphering the root cause.

Research suggests that a digital divide exists and that women of socioeconomic status are often at a disadvantage by the consequences of this divide. One repercussion of this chasm is a lack of adequate information; particularly of accurate and accessible reproductive health information which has been found to be related to poor reproductive health. This research will employ a quantitative approach by means of adapting a previously validated assessment tool of pregnancy-related information seeking behavior to gauge reproductive health information-seeking in low-income women.


Speakers
MS

Margaret Sullivan Zimmerman

University of South Carolina, United States of America


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 7.2 C Juried Paper: Engaging Communities through Research and Practice: A New LIS Curricula
Community engagement, with user communities and practitioner communities in particular, sits at the heart of designing library services, programs, and spaces to best meet the needs of specific communities (Scott 2011). To help libraries best meet the needs of their increasingly diverse communities, MLIS students need to emerge from their programs with an understanding of how to engage communities while utilizing best practices, as defined by relevant research, to create services of all kinds that meet the needs of these communities (Mehra & Robinson, 2009). Building on the work that information researchers are doing to examine the relationships between research and practice (Abbas et al., 2016), it is crucial for MLIS faculty and instructors to understand how to utilize a seamless partnership of research-based frameworks and effective practices to incorporate community engagement into a wide variety of MLIS courses.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Braun

Linda Braun

Learning Consultant, LEO
KC

Kathleen Campana

PhD Candidate, University of Washington, United States of America
JE

J. Elizabeth Mills

PhD Student, University of Washington, United States of America
I have most recently been a research assistant on Project VIEWS2, a study of early literacy in public library storytimes using measurement tools based on early learning benchmarks. My own research explores the role of culture in public library storytimes as a way to include and welcome children of all communities to share in this valuable learning experience.


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 1

8:30am

Session 7.3 A Juried Paper: Developing a Community Engaged Model of Scholarship in Archival Studies

This paper discusses a community engaged model of scholarship in archival studies that encompasses research, teaching, and service. It reports on the initial development and implementation of a community engaged model of scholarship using the author’s community-centered research in Boston, Massachusetts with a local immigrant Latino population.

The community-centered research project uses the testimonio (testimony) as a narrative device to record the life histories of the Latino population who bear witness to and are experiencing displacement as a result of urban renewal and gentrification phenomena. In Latin America, the testimonio is symbolically powerful as it dates back to pre-Columbian societies through oral traditions, to national liberation movements, to the more recent formation of truth and reconciliation commissions as sites for human rights victims and violators to bear witness. Therefore, using the testimonio is epistemologically meaningful and warranted given the political nature of the phenomena.


Speakers

Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 3

8:30am

Session 7.3 B Juried Paper: Preparing Knowledge Workers: Knowledge Literacy for the Workplace
This paper draws on the discipline of Knowledge Management to outline a vision for workplace literacy instruction as students prepare to enter the workforce. This includes a definition of Knowledge Literacy that can go alongside instruction in Information Literacy. Recognizing that information literacy is still a missing yet much needed skill, it is necessary to extend these boundaries of what it means for a student to be workplace literate. Drucker (1993) noted that “The manual worker is yesterday….the basic capital resource . . . is the knowledge worker who puts to work what he has learned . . . rather than the man who puts to work manual skill or muscle.”

Speakers

Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 3

8:30am

Session 7.3 C Juried Paper: Experiential Learning for Online Students: Rolling Out to Community Engagement
Innovative pedagogies are needed in distance education in order to provide students with experiential learning opportunities that connect to the communities where they work. In particular, pre-service school librarians needs hands-on experiences with emerging technologies such as coding and robotics in order to lead their integration in K-12 settings. Unfortunately, often in schools, a clearly defined plan for technology integration is not developed, causing new technology to go unused, wasting the resources spent (Bauer & Kenton, 2005). The methods for integrating technology with curriculum are frequently implemented with little planning or comprehensive thought to pedagogic implementation (Buckingham, 2007; Cuban, 2001; Selwyn & Gerard, 2002). Frequently, decision makers only provide the tools without allowing for the necessary training in how to properly implement the technology.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth A. Burns

Elizabeth A. Burns

Assistant Professor, Old Dominion University
SK

Sue Kimmel

Associate Professor, Old Dominion University
Ask me about earning a PhD in curriculum and instruction.


Friday January 20, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Atlanta 3

10:00am

Morning Break
Friday January 20, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Georgia/Capitol Foyer

10:30am

President's Program: Best Practices for Incorporating Community Engagement and Outreach in Curricula
This session will explore how LIS curricula can align learning goals and community engagement goals to ensure a rich student learning experience. Content should inform students about various dimensions of their community project and, likewise, community engagement should allow opportunities to learn course content at deeper levels. How do we encourage and support community involvement in such activities as project planning, student orientation, presentations, and so forth? Julia Gaines and Jennifer Frum, from the University of Georgia, will start the session with a discussion of their experiences with community engagement. Facilitated group discussions will follow to explore opportunities for community engagement in LIS curricula.

Access the session webpage here

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Cooke

Nicole Cooke

Assistant Professor, The School Information Sciences, University of Illinois
avatar for Bharat Mehra

Bharat Mehra

University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Dr. Mehra's research examines diversity and intercultural communication, social justice in library and information science (LIS), critical and cross-cultural studies, and community informatics or the use of information and communication technologies to empower minority and underserved populations. He has applied action research towards community building and community development activities while collaborating with racial/ethnic groups... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Georgia

12:00pm

ALISE Board of Directors Meeting
Friday January 20, 2017 12:00pm - 3:00pm
Georgia 9